A Wrinkle in Time

“Qui plussait, plus se tait. French, you know. The more a man knows, the less he talks.”
― Madeleine L’Engle, A Wrinkle in Time

A Wrinkle in Time (Time Quintet, #1)

A Wrinkle in Time is a science fantasy novel written by American writer Madeleine L’Engle, first published in 1962. It is also a first book of a Time Quintet.

Book follows the lives of the Murray family. Father of Meg and Charles Wallace has disappeared mysteriously a long time ago. One day the kids meet a new friend Calvin and three strange women named: Mrs. Who, Mrs. Whatsit and Mrs. Which. These ladies tell children that their father is in danger and that they have to travel through time to find him.

“We can’t take any credit for our talents. It’s how we use them that counts.”
― Madeleine L’Engle, A Wrinkle in Time: With Related Readings

I had a hard time getting into this novel. I guess it had been on my TBR list for a long time because but I truly learned about the existence of this book when the movie adaptation hit the theatres. I have mixed feeling about Wrinkle in Time. I felt like the younger me would have loved it but somehow magic of this book didn’t reach me as adult. And that made me confused because I still love Narnia to death.

There were a lot of good  things in this book. First, genre is funny… it’s like science fiction except that it’s fantasy and that shows in the book. I feel like it has more emotion and less technical/ science fiction-y mumbo-jumbo. I liked W Ladies and them quoting everything and everyone because the words did not come easy for them. And I liked how simple everything was. Evil in this book is mostly described as ‘The Black Thing’ or/and ‘IT’, yet you knew exactly what it was.

“Euripedes. Nothing is hopeless; we must hope for everything.”
― Madeleine L’Engle, A Wrinkle in Time

Characters were well built and Meg is an unique persona. I don’t know that many main characters who’d be like her. Homely, awkward and math loving. Fantasy elements, new worlds and creatures were entertaining.
4/5 stars but I wouldn’t read it again.

How-To Read A Wrinkle in Time
1.
Short (just over 200 pages) simple and creative, perfect read for kids. I think it also has nice lessons on how things and people and places are different and how we should always fight the evil in this world.
2. First part of a quintet so there are 3 books more for those who adored this.
3. I sensed some religion-ess in this book. A bit similar to Narnia.

“A book, too, can be a star, “explosive material, capable of stirring up fresh life endlessly,” a living fire to lighten the darkness, leading out into the expanding universe.”
― Madeleine L’Engle, A Wrinkle in Time

Have you read this? Thoughts?
Have you seen the newest movie adaptation? I haven’t but I found cast choices interesting.

Featured image source

How-To Walk The Yellow Brick Road

“There is no place like home.”
― L. Frank Baum, The Wonderful Wizard of Oz

The Wonderful Wizard of Oz is a children’s novel written by author L. Frank Baum and illustrated by W. W. Denslow. It was first published in 1900. Book consists of twenty-four chapters that tell the story of Dorothy’s arrival in Oz and her adventures in that magical country.

A tornado picks up Dorothy Gale’s house and carries it all the way from Kansas to the land of Oz. Dorothy’s house lands on the Wicked Witch of the East, crushing her. The Munchinks (people dressed in blue , group of the Queerest people Dorothy had ever seen)  give Dorothy the witch’s prized silver slippers as thanks for freeing them from the Wicked Witch. They also advise Dorothy to seek out the Wizard of Oz who has the power to send her home. On the way to the Emerald City, Dorothy befriends Scarecrow, Woodman, and Cowardly Lion. They all seem to want something from the wizard.

“You have plenty of courage, I am sure,” answered Oz. “All you need is confidence in yourself. There is no living thing that is not afraid when it faces danger. The true courage is in facing danger when you are afraid, and that kind of courage you have in plenty.”
― L. Frank Baum, The Wonderful Wizard of Oz

It’s somehow hard to believe that it’s already been 117 years since this was first published. It’s a story that has lasted time very well. I love Baum’s imagination and how he came up with this. Characters are pretty cool. And they have these very simple flaws or wants. Dorothy wants to go home,  the Tin Man wants a heart,  the Scarecrow wants a brain and the Lion wants courage.

“Oh, I see;” said the Tin Woodman. “But, after all, brains are not the best things in the world.”
Have you any?” enquired the Scarecrow.
No, my head is quite empty,” answered the Woodman; “but once I had brains, and a heart also; so, having tried them both, I should much rather have a heart.”
― L. Frank Baum, The Wonderful Wizard of Oz

3,5 stars/5.  This might seem like a low rating and it’s not. I do like the whole series actually, however this was somehow too light and cute for me.

“Oh – You’re a very bad man!”
Oh, no my dear. I’m a very good man. I’m just a very bad Wizard.”
― L. Frank Baum, The Wonderful Wizard of Oz

How- To Read The Wonderful Wizard of Oz
1.
If you like fairytales in general and like Alice in Wonderland and haven’t read this yet, then I warmly recommend this to you.
2.
In case you liked this, there’s plenty of more.  The Wonderful Wizard of Oz is the first part in Oz Series which consists of 14 books.
3.
This is quite short, just a little over 150 pages. Perfect for younger readers :) You can find WWoO for free on Project Gutenberg as an e-book.
4.
I reviewed Peter Pan on my blog a while ago and I remember writing about how sad it is. With The Wonderful Wizard of Oz the case is the opposite. It’s almost too happy.
5.
In case you haven’t heard Judy Garland yet: Somewhere Over The Rainbow

Have you read this? Thoughts?

The Boy Who Would Not Grow Up

“Dreams do come true, if only we wish hard enough. You can have anything in life if you will sacrifice everything else for it.”
― J.M. Barrie, Peter Pan

Peter Pan; or, the Boy Who Wouldn’t Grow Up or Peter and Wendy is J. M. Barrie’s most famous work, in the form of a 1904 play and a 1911 novel. It tells the story of Peter Pan, a mischievous little boy who can fly, and has many adventures on the island of Neverland that is inhabited by mermaids, fairies, Native Americans, and pirates.

“Second star to the right and straight on ’til morning. ”
― J.M. Barrie, Peter Pan

I think Peter Pan was something that I first learned about through Disney’s film adaptation many years ago. I think no matter in what format you first learned about this story, it will always be a story of making the impossible possible by believing. And that one must believe in fairies.

“When the first baby laughed for the first time, its laugh broke into a thousand pieces, and they all went skipping about, and that was the beginning of fairies.”
― J.M. Barrie, Peter Pan

There are many magical things about Peter Pan’s story. The story is wonderful. Something magical happens and three ordinary kids are taken to a magical land. The Neverland and to find it you must find the second star to the right and straight on ’til morning. And there they encounter many different kinds of adventures.

“Stars are beautiful, but they may not take part in anything, they must just look on forever.”
― J.M. Barrie, Peter Pan

Characters are one of a kind, I think. There’s the one and only boy who would not grow up, Peter Pan, a young boy dressed in leaves and the only one able to fly without the help of Tinker Bell’s golden fairy dust. And Tinker Bell. I understand very well why she became the messenger of Disney’s magic. She’s no fancy fairy, she mends pots and kettles and even though she’s usually helpful and kind to Peter, from time to time she’s also ill-behaved and vindictive.

“Tink was not all bad: or, rather, she was all bad just now, but, on the other hand, sometimes she was all good. Fairies have to be one thing or the other, because being so small they unfortunately have room for one feeling only at a time. They are, however, allowed to change, only it must be a complete change.”
― J.M. Barrie, Peter Pan

Then there’s The Darling Family and the children: John, Michael & Wendy Darling. The lattest one is the eldest one of the children who likes the idea of homemaking and wants to be a mother which she sort of also becomes for the Lost Boys. I never liked Wendy’s character for some reason. & The Lost Boys, sad but fascinating idea about how they turned up in Neverland. And then also one of my all-time favorite villains: Captain James Hook. Who wants to kill Peter Pan. Not so much because Peter cut off his right hand but because Peter drives him to madness. Oh and the ticking crocodile.

“The moment you doubt whether you can fly, you cease forever to be able to do it.”
― J.M. Barrie, Peter Pan

I really adore Peter Pan, however, I can’t quite bring myself to give it 5 stars review as there were a couple of things that I did not like: Wendy was really annoying and the last chapter of the story was also rather annoying. I think perhaps the book would have been better without it. And then the background of this story is a sad one.

“To live will be an awfully big adventure.”
― J.M. Barrie, Peter Pan

4/5 stars

How-To Read Peter Pan
1.
A dear child has many names. This novel goes by different titles such as: Peter Pan or Boy Who Wouldn’t Grow Up or Peter and Wendy. If you’re looking for one with illustrations you might want to look for Peter & Wendy.
2.
There are two prequels to Peter Pan’s story called: Peter Pan in Kensington Gardens: “Before he flew away to Neverland, the little boy who wouldn’t grow up dwelt in the heart of London, with birds and fairies as his companions.” and  The Little White Bird where only few chapters are about Peter Pan and the rest focus on Barrie’s ponderings. I think only Peter Pan’s story matters but if you’re a fan, I warmly recommend the first part too.
3.
You can read and download Peter Pan and all the other works by J.M. Barrie for free at Project Gutenberg: https://www.gutenberg.org/ebooks/16
4.
Don’t get me started about Disney’s adaptation. I love it. And it’s nice to read the story after you’ve seen the film. The novel is a bit darker.
5. Clap your hands and say, ‘I believe in fairies!’

“Never say goodbye because goodbye means going away and going away means forgetting.”
― J.M. Barrie, Peter Pan

Thoughts? Did you first read Peter Pan or see the Disney adaptation of it?

Charlie and the Chocolate Factory

“Mr Willy Wonka can make marshmallows that taste of violets, and rich caramels that change colour every ten seconds as you suck them, and little feathery sweets that melt away deliciously the moment you put them between your lips. He can make chewing-gum that never loses its taste, and sugar balloons that you can blow up to enormous sizes before you pop them with a pin and gobble them up. And, by a most secret method, he can make lovely blue birds’ eggs with black spots on them, and when you put one of these in your mouth, it gradually gets smaller and smaller until suddenly there is nothing left except a tiny little DARKRED sugary baby bird sitting on the tip of your tongue.”
― Roald Dahl, Charlie and the Chocolate Factory

Charlie and the Chocolate Factory is a 1964 children’s book by British author Roald Dahl. The story features the adventures of young Charlie Bucket inside the chocolate factory of eccentric chocolatier Willy Wonka.The story was originally inspired by Roald Dahl’s experience of chocolate companies during his schooldays. At that time (around the 1920s), Cadbury and Rowntree’s were England’s two largest chocolate makers and they each often tried to steal trade secrets by sending spies, posing as employees, into the other’s factory.

The plot of this book centers an 11-year-old boy named Charlie Bucket who in lives  in a tiny house with his parents and four grandparents. Every year, on his birthday, Charlie gets one Wonka Bar for present. Then, one year, Willy Wonka decides to open the doors of his factory to five children and their parents after 10 years of keeping it sealed.  In order to choose who will enter the factory and also receive a lifetime supply of chocolate, Mr. Wonka hides five golden tickets in the wrappers of his Wonka chocolate bars. The search for the five golden tickets is fast and furious. Each ticket find is a media sensation and each finder becomes a celebrity. The first four golden tickets are found by Augustus Gloop, Veruca Salt, Violet Beauregarde and Mike Teavee.

“So please, oh please, we beg, we pray,
Go throw your TV set away,
And in its place you can install
A lovely bookshelf on the wall.
Then fill the shelves with lots of books.”
― Roald Dahl, Charlie and the Chocolate Factory

And of course, eventually, the fifth golden ticket is found by Charlie Bucket. Factory visit, however, is far from an ordinary one. In fact, quite a lot of things go very wrong.

 

I adore Roald Dahl’s books. When I read it for the first time when I was a kid, it was a magical experience. I loved the characters, very poor Charlie, gluttonous Augustus,  spoiled  spoiled Veruca,gum addict Violet, and the TV-obsessed Mike and parents or relatives of these children, mad & genius Willy Wonka (I mean just think about how he invented television chocolate)  & mysterious Oompa Loompas.

“Whipped cream isn’t whipped cream at all if it hasnt been whipped with whips, just like poached eggs isn’t poached eggs unless it’s been stolen in the dead of the night.”
― Roald Dahl, Charlie and the Chocolate Factory

I loved the puns and the made-up words. Quentin Blake’s illustrations are just perfect for Roald Dahl’s books.

“Of course they’re real people. They’re Oompa-Loompas…Imported direct from Loompaland…And oh what a terrible country it is! Nothing but thick jungles infested by the most dangerous beasts in the world – hornswogglers and snozzwangers and those terrible wicked whangdoodles. A whangdoodle would eat ten Oompa-Loompas for breakfast and come galloping back for a second helping.”
― Roald Dahl, Charlie and the Chocolate Factory

For many years I longed for golden ticket to be a real thing…
5/5 stars

How-To Read Charlie and the Chocolate Factory

1.This is for children of all ages.  think every kid should read this / all the parents should read this to their kids.
2.
You’ll love this if you adore stories with talented imaginations.
3. It’s kind of dark for a children’s book. I didn’t think of it as a kid but indeed… Charlie sleeps on a mattress on the floor and his family is starving to death, Oompa Loompas never leave the factory and they are paid in beans, Willy Wonka is untouchable billionaire corporate owner…
4. Story of Charlie Bucket continues in a sequel called Charlie and the Great Glass Elevator.
5. There are two wonderful movie adaptations:1971 American musical directed by Mel Stuart, and starring Gene Wilder as Willy Wonka & 2005 British-American musical directed by Tim Burton and starring Johnny Depp as Willy Wonka.

“Mr. Wonka: “Don’t forget what happened to the man who suddenly got everything he wanted.”
Charlie Bucket: “What happened?”
Mr. Wonka: “He lived happily ever after.”
― Roald Dahl, Charlie and the Chocolate Factory

Have you read this? Thoughts? What’s your favorite book by Roald Dahl? I think mine is this one & Matilda.