Top Ten Favorite Non-Fiction of 2017

As always, Top Ten Tuesday meme is hosted by The Broke and the Bookish. This week’s topic is:Top Ten Favorite Books of 2017.

I’m twisting this topic a little bit to best nonfiction I read this year because I don’t review enough of it…and these lists are only way to give out some recognition to these great authors.

1. Hunger:A Me­moir of (My) Body by Roxane Gay

“So many years past being raped, I tell myself what happened is “in the past.” This is only partly true. In too many ways, the past is still with me. The past is written on my body. I carry it every single day. The past sometimes feels like it might kill me. It is a very heavy burden.”
― Roxane Gay, Hunger

2. Voices from Chernobyl by Svetlana Alexievich

“Show me a fantasy novel about Chernobyl–there isn’t one! Because reality is more fantastic.”
― Svetlana Alexievich, Voices from Chernobyl: The Oral History of a Nuclear Disaster

3. Underground by Haruki Murakami

“It was just that, no matter where I found myself, I felt like there was a hole inside me, with the wind rushing through. I never felt satisfied. From the outside you wouldn’t imagine I had any troubles.”
― Haruki Murakami, Underground: The Tokyo Gas Attack and the Japanese Psyche

4. A – Bomb Mayor: Warnings and Hope from Hiroshima by Shinzo Hamai

5. Bad Feminist by Roxane Gay

“It’s hard to be told to lighten up because if you lighten up any more, you’re going to float the fuck away.” — Roxanne Gay

6. Prozac Nation by Elizabeth Wurtzel

“Some friends don’t understand this. They don’t understand how desperate I am to have someone say, I love you and I support you just the way you are because you’re wonderful just the way you are. They don’t understand that I can’t remember anyone ever saying that to me. I am so demanding and difficult for my friends because I want to crumble and fall apart before them so that they will love me even though I am no fun, lying in bed, crying all the time, not moving. Depression is all about If you loved me you would.”  – Elizabeth Wurtzel

7. Kind, versprich mir dass du dich erschiesst by Florian Huber 

8. Guns, Germs And Steel by Jared Diamond

“In short, Europe’s colonization of Africa had nothing to do with differences between European and African peoples themselves, as white racists assume. Rather, it was due to accidents of geography and biogeography—in particular, to the continents’ different areas, axes, and suites of wild plant and animal species. That is, the different historical trajectories of Africa and Europe stem ultimately from differences in real estate.” — Jared Diamond

9. The Underground Girls of Kabdul by Jenny Nordberg

When one gender is so unwanted, so despised, and so suppressed in a place where daughters are expressly unwanted, perhaps both the body and the mind of a growing human can be expected to revolt against becoming a woman. And thus, perhaps, alter someone for good.” —  Jenny Nordberg

10. Fast Food Nation by Eric Schlosser

“The medical literature on the causes of food poisoning is full of euphemisms and dry scientific terms: coliform levels, aerobic plate counts, sorbitol, MacConkey agar, and so on. Behind them lies a simple explanation for why eating a hamburger can now make you seriously ill: There is shit in the meat.” —  Eric Schlosser

 

Top Ten Scifi Books On My Winter TBR

As always, Top Ten Tuesday meme is hosted by The Broke and the BookishThis week’s topic is: Top Ten Books On My Winter TBR and as we are still in SciFi month so I made this post a part it. Check it out.

1.The Illuminae Files by Amie Kaufman and Jay Kristoff

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Goodreads blurb: The year is 2575, and two rival megacorporations are at war over a planet that’s little more than an ice-covered speck at the edge of the universe. Too bad nobody thought to warn the people living on it. With enemy fire raining down on them, Kady and Ezra—who are barely even talking to each other—are forced to fight their way onto an evacuating fleet, with an enemy warship in hot pursuit.

2. Artemis by Andy Weir

Goodreads blurb: Jazz Bashara is a criminal.
Well, sort of. Life on Artemis, the first and only city on the moon, is tough if you’re not a rich tourist or an eccentric billionaire. So smuggling in the occasional harmless bit of contraband barely counts, right? Not when you’ve got debts to pay and your job as a porter barely covers the rent.

3. Saga #8 by Brian K. Vaughan & Fiona Staples

Goodreads blurb: After the traumatic events of the War for Phang, Hazel, her parents, and their surviving companions embark on a life-changing adventure at the westernmost edge of the universe.

4. Iron Gold by Pierce Brown (Red Rising Saga #4)


Goodreads blurb: They call him father, liberator, warlord, Reaper. But he feels a boy as he falls toward the pale blue planet, his armor red, his army vast, his heart heavy. It is the tenth year of war and the thirty-second of his life. 

5. Lord of Light by Roger Zelazny

Goodreads blurb: Earth is long since dead. On a colony planet, a band of men has gained control of technology, made themselves immortal, and now rule their world as the gods of the Hindu pantheon. Only one dares oppose them: he who was once Siddhartha and is now Mahasamatman. Binder of Demons, Lord of Light.

6. WE by Yevgeny Zamyatin

Goodreads blurb: WE tells the story of the minutely organized United State, where all citizens are not individuals but only he-Numbers and she-Numbers existing in identical glass apartments with every action regulated by the “Table of Hours.” It is a community dedicated to the proposition that freedom and happiness are incompatible; that most men believe their freedom to be more than a fair exchange for a high level of materialistic happiness.

7. All Systems Red by Martha Wells

Goodreads blurb: On a distant planet, a team of scientists are conducting surface tests, shadowed by their Company-supplied ‘droid — a self-aware SecUnit that has hacked its own governor module, and refers to itself (though never out loud) as “Murderbot.” Scornful of humans, all it really wants is to be left alone long enough to figure out who it is. But when a neighboring mission goes dark, it’s up to the scientists and their Murderbot to get to the truth.

8. Old Man’s War by John Scalzi

Goodreads blurb: John Perry did two things on his 75th birthday. First he visited his wife’s grave. Then he joined the army. The good news is that humanity finally made it into interstellar space. The bad news is that planets fit to live on are scarce– and alien races willing to fight us for them are common. So: we fight. To defend Earth, and to stake our own claim to planetary real estate. Far from Earth, the war has been going on for decades: brutal, bloody, unyielding.

9. Larklight Series by Philip Reeve

Goodreads blurb: Arthur (Art) Mumsby and his irritating sister Myrtle live with their father in a huge and rambling house called Larklight…that just happens to be traveling through outer space. When a visitor called Mr. Webster arrives for a visit, it is far from an innocent social call. Before long Art and Myrtle are off on an adventure to the furthest reaches of space, where they will do battle with evil forces in order to save each other―and the universe.

10.  A Wrinkle in Time by Madeleine L’Engle

Goodreads blurb: Wild nights are my glory,” the unearthly stranger told them. “I just got caught in a downdraft and blown off course. Let me be on my way. Speaking of way, by the way, there is such a thing as a tesseract”. Meg’s father had been experimenting with this fifth dimension of time travel when he mysteriously disappeared. Now the time has come for Meg, her friend Calvin, and Charles Wallace to rescue him. But can they outwit the forces of evil they will encounter on their heart-stopping journey through space?

What books are on your winter TBR? What books are you looking forward to being published? Have you read any of these? Tell me where I should start.

Picture by: https://pixabay.com/fi/users/tombud-1908037/ and Goodreads cover images.