A Wrinkle in Time

“Qui plussait, plus se tait. French, you know. The more a man knows, the less he talks.”
― Madeleine L’Engle, A Wrinkle in Time

A Wrinkle in Time (Time Quintet, #1)

A Wrinkle in Time is a science fantasy novel written by American writer Madeleine L’Engle, first published in 1962. It is also a first book of a Time Quintet.

Book follows the lives of the Murray family. Father of Meg and Charles Wallace has disappeared mysteriously a long time ago. One day the kids meet a new friend Calvin and three strange women named: Mrs. Who, Mrs. Whatsit and Mrs. Which. These ladies tell children that their father is in danger and that they have to travel through time to find him.

“We can’t take any credit for our talents. It’s how we use them that counts.”
― Madeleine L’Engle, A Wrinkle in Time: With Related Readings

I had a hard time getting into this novel. I guess it had been on my TBR list for a long time because but I truly learned about the existence of this book when the movie adaptation hit the theatres. I have mixed feeling about Wrinkle in Time. I felt like the younger me would have loved it but somehow magic of this book didn’t reach me as adult. And that made me confused because I still love Narnia to death.

There were a lot of good  things in this book. First, genre is funny… it’s like science fiction except that it’s fantasy and that shows in the book. I feel like it has more emotion and less technical/ science fiction-y mumbo-jumbo. I liked W Ladies and them quoting everything and everyone because the words did not come easy for them. And I liked how simple everything was. Evil in this book is mostly described as ‘The Black Thing’ or/and ‘IT’, yet you knew exactly what it was.

“Euripedes. Nothing is hopeless; we must hope for everything.”
― Madeleine L’Engle, A Wrinkle in Time

Characters were well built and Meg is an unique persona. I don’t know that many main characters who’d be like her. Homely, awkward and math loving. Fantasy elements, new worlds and creatures were entertaining.
4/5 stars but I wouldn’t read it again.

How-To Read A Wrinkle in Time
1.
Short (just over 200 pages) simple and creative, perfect read for kids. I think it also has nice lessons on how things and people and places are different and how we should always fight the evil in this world.
2. First part of a quintet so there are 3 books more for those who adored this.
3. I sensed some religion-ess in this book. A bit similar to Narnia.

“A book, too, can be a star, “explosive material, capable of stirring up fresh life endlessly,” a living fire to lighten the darkness, leading out into the expanding universe.”
― Madeleine L’Engle, A Wrinkle in Time

Have you read this? Thoughts?
Have you seen the newest movie adaptation? I haven’t but I found cast choices interesting.

Featured image source

Charlie and the Chocolate Factory

“Mr Willy Wonka can make marshmallows that taste of violets, and rich caramels that change colour every ten seconds as you suck them, and little feathery sweets that melt away deliciously the moment you put them between your lips. He can make chewing-gum that never loses its taste, and sugar balloons that you can blow up to enormous sizes before you pop them with a pin and gobble them up. And, by a most secret method, he can make lovely blue birds’ eggs with black spots on them, and when you put one of these in your mouth, it gradually gets smaller and smaller until suddenly there is nothing left except a tiny little DARKRED sugary baby bird sitting on the tip of your tongue.”
― Roald Dahl, Charlie and the Chocolate Factory

Charlie and the Chocolate Factory is a 1964 children’s book by British author Roald Dahl. The story features the adventures of young Charlie Bucket inside the chocolate factory of eccentric chocolatier Willy Wonka.The story was originally inspired by Roald Dahl’s experience of chocolate companies during his schooldays. At that time (around the 1920s), Cadbury and Rowntree’s were England’s two largest chocolate makers and they each often tried to steal trade secrets by sending spies, posing as employees, into the other’s factory.

The plot of this book centers an 11-year-old boy named Charlie Bucket who in lives  in a tiny house with his parents and four grandparents. Every year, on his birthday, Charlie gets one Wonka Bar for present. Then, one year, Willy Wonka decides to open the doors of his factory to five children and their parents after 10 years of keeping it sealed.  In order to choose who will enter the factory and also receive a lifetime supply of chocolate, Mr. Wonka hides five golden tickets in the wrappers of his Wonka chocolate bars. The search for the five golden tickets is fast and furious. Each ticket find is a media sensation and each finder becomes a celebrity. The first four golden tickets are found by Augustus Gloop, Veruca Salt, Violet Beauregarde and Mike Teavee.

“So please, oh please, we beg, we pray,
Go throw your TV set away,
And in its place you can install
A lovely bookshelf on the wall.
Then fill the shelves with lots of books.”
― Roald Dahl, Charlie and the Chocolate Factory

And of course, eventually, the fifth golden ticket is found by Charlie Bucket. Factory visit, however, is far from an ordinary one. In fact, quite a lot of things go very wrong.

 

I adore Roald Dahl’s books. When I read it for the first time when I was a kid, it was a magical experience. I loved the characters, very poor Charlie, gluttonous Augustus,  spoiled  spoiled Veruca,gum addict Violet, and the TV-obsessed Mike and parents or relatives of these children, mad & genius Willy Wonka (I mean just think about how he invented television chocolate)  & mysterious Oompa Loompas.

“Whipped cream isn’t whipped cream at all if it hasnt been whipped with whips, just like poached eggs isn’t poached eggs unless it’s been stolen in the dead of the night.”
― Roald Dahl, Charlie and the Chocolate Factory

I loved the puns and the made-up words. Quentin Blake’s illustrations are just perfect for Roald Dahl’s books.

“Of course they’re real people. They’re Oompa-Loompas…Imported direct from Loompaland…And oh what a terrible country it is! Nothing but thick jungles infested by the most dangerous beasts in the world – hornswogglers and snozzwangers and those terrible wicked whangdoodles. A whangdoodle would eat ten Oompa-Loompas for breakfast and come galloping back for a second helping.”
― Roald Dahl, Charlie and the Chocolate Factory

For many years I longed for golden ticket to be a real thing…
5/5 stars

How-To Read Charlie and the Chocolate Factory

1.This is for children of all ages.  think every kid should read this / all the parents should read this to their kids.
2.
You’ll love this if you adore stories with talented imaginations.
3. It’s kind of dark for a children’s book. I didn’t think of it as a kid but indeed… Charlie sleeps on a mattress on the floor and his family is starving to death, Oompa Loompas never leave the factory and they are paid in beans, Willy Wonka is untouchable billionaire corporate owner…
4. Story of Charlie Bucket continues in a sequel called Charlie and the Great Glass Elevator.
5. There are two wonderful movie adaptations:1971 American musical directed by Mel Stuart, and starring Gene Wilder as Willy Wonka & 2005 British-American musical directed by Tim Burton and starring Johnny Depp as Willy Wonka.

“Mr. Wonka: “Don’t forget what happened to the man who suddenly got everything he wanted.”
Charlie Bucket: “What happened?”
Mr. Wonka: “He lived happily ever after.”
― Roald Dahl, Charlie and the Chocolate Factory

Have you read this? Thoughts? What’s your favorite book by Roald Dahl? I think mine is this one & Matilda.

How-To Use the Power of the Books

“A BOOK?! WHAT D’YOU WANNA FLAMING BOOK FOR?…WE’VE GOT A LOVELY TELLY WITH A 12-INCH SCREEN AND NOW YA WANNA BOOK!”
― Roald Dahl, Matilda

Matilda written by Roald Dahl should be favorite book of every little girl who is  loves to read. reader. In fact it should be on favorite-list of all those who love to read as it is story about reading and (voracious) reader. I read Matilda soon after I learned to read and I think my childhood would be emptier without it.

“Matilda said, “Never do anything by halves if you want to get away with it. Be outrageous. Go the whole hog. Make sure everything you do is so completely crazy it’s unbelievable…”
― Roald Dahl, Matilda

One of my favorite parts in the book :D

Why I love Matilda is because it’s very creative and story is simple. And I can relate to her love for books.  Matilda discovers her love of books and learns to read by the age of three. At four years and three months, she has read all the children’s stories in the library and ask the librarian what to read.

“The books transported her into new worlds and introduced her to amazing people who lived exciting lives. She went on olden-day sailing ships with Joseph Conrad. She went to Africa with Ernest Hemingway and to India with Rudyard Kipling. She travelled all over the world while sitting in her little room in an English village.”
― Roald Dahl, Matilda

During this process, I can’t understand rest of her family at all.  My parents were always happy that I read whereas Matilda’s parents are really discouraging. Matilda’s father: ““What’s wrong with the telly, for heaven’s sake?” and Matilda’s mother thinks looks are more important than looks and spends all her days playing bingo. Matilda also has a brother, which is quite hard to remember because he isn’t really there in the book. I think it’s interesting question though why is Michael treated normal while Matilda is neglected?

I also like Matilda because even if she is smart in all the subjects at school (and + telekinesis), she is still kind of… mean like kids often are. For example she lines  her father’s hat with super glue. No one is perfect, although of course his father deserved it.

I would easily give this book 9,5/10

How-To Read Matilda
1.
No matter of what age you are, you should read it. If book seems too long, it’s just because of the big font and lots of funny pictures :)
2.
It is highly nescessary to pick Matilda with illustrations, like by Quentin Blake (I think his are simple so they don’t spoil your imagination), because it adds the enjoyoment.
3.
The names are funny and nice as they tend to be in children’s books, and it’s easy to tell who’s good and who’s not so good… Miss Honey…Miss Trunchbull. All the name-calling was also so talented.
4.
If you read a lot, you can compare your books with ones Matilda has read :D don’t worry too much for Matilda, all will be good.
5.
The movie version is good but not that good, try other books by Roald Dahl in stead.

Buy Matilda on Amazon