Top Ten Scifi Books On My Winter TBR

As always, Top Ten Tuesday meme is hosted by The Broke and the BookishThis week’s topic is: Top Ten Books On My Winter TBR and as we are still in SciFi month so I made this post a part it. Check it out.

1.The Illuminae Files by Amie Kaufman and Jay Kristoff

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Goodreads blurb: The year is 2575, and two rival megacorporations are at war over a planet that’s little more than an ice-covered speck at the edge of the universe. Too bad nobody thought to warn the people living on it. With enemy fire raining down on them, Kady and Ezra—who are barely even talking to each other—are forced to fight their way onto an evacuating fleet, with an enemy warship in hot pursuit.

2. Artemis by Andy Weir

Goodreads blurb: Jazz Bashara is a criminal.
Well, sort of. Life on Artemis, the first and only city on the moon, is tough if you’re not a rich tourist or an eccentric billionaire. So smuggling in the occasional harmless bit of contraband barely counts, right? Not when you’ve got debts to pay and your job as a porter barely covers the rent.

3. Saga #8 by Brian K. Vaughan & Fiona Staples

Goodreads blurb: After the traumatic events of the War for Phang, Hazel, her parents, and their surviving companions embark on a life-changing adventure at the westernmost edge of the universe.

4. Iron Gold by Pierce Brown (Red Rising Saga #4)


Goodreads blurb: They call him father, liberator, warlord, Reaper. But he feels a boy as he falls toward the pale blue planet, his armor red, his army vast, his heart heavy. It is the tenth year of war and the thirty-second of his life. 

5. Lord of Light by Roger Zelazny

Goodreads blurb: Earth is long since dead. On a colony planet, a band of men has gained control of technology, made themselves immortal, and now rule their world as the gods of the Hindu pantheon. Only one dares oppose them: he who was once Siddhartha and is now Mahasamatman. Binder of Demons, Lord of Light.

6. WE by Yevgeny Zamyatin

Goodreads blurb: WE tells the story of the minutely organized United State, where all citizens are not individuals but only he-Numbers and she-Numbers existing in identical glass apartments with every action regulated by the “Table of Hours.” It is a community dedicated to the proposition that freedom and happiness are incompatible; that most men believe their freedom to be more than a fair exchange for a high level of materialistic happiness.

7. All Systems Red by Martha Wells

Goodreads blurb: On a distant planet, a team of scientists are conducting surface tests, shadowed by their Company-supplied ‘droid — a self-aware SecUnit that has hacked its own governor module, and refers to itself (though never out loud) as “Murderbot.” Scornful of humans, all it really wants is to be left alone long enough to figure out who it is. But when a neighboring mission goes dark, it’s up to the scientists and their Murderbot to get to the truth.

8. Old Man’s War by John Scalzi

Goodreads blurb: John Perry did two things on his 75th birthday. First he visited his wife’s grave. Then he joined the army. The good news is that humanity finally made it into interstellar space. The bad news is that planets fit to live on are scarce– and alien races willing to fight us for them are common. So: we fight. To defend Earth, and to stake our own claim to planetary real estate. Far from Earth, the war has been going on for decades: brutal, bloody, unyielding.

9. Larklight Series by Philip Reeve

Goodreads blurb: Arthur (Art) Mumsby and his irritating sister Myrtle live with their father in a huge and rambling house called Larklight…that just happens to be traveling through outer space. When a visitor called Mr. Webster arrives for a visit, it is far from an innocent social call. Before long Art and Myrtle are off on an adventure to the furthest reaches of space, where they will do battle with evil forces in order to save each other―and the universe.

10.  A Wrinkle in Time by Madeleine L’Engle

Goodreads blurb: Wild nights are my glory,” the unearthly stranger told them. “I just got caught in a downdraft and blown off course. Let me be on my way. Speaking of way, by the way, there is such a thing as a tesseract”. Meg’s father had been experimenting with this fifth dimension of time travel when he mysteriously disappeared. Now the time has come for Meg, her friend Calvin, and Charles Wallace to rescue him. But can they outwit the forces of evil they will encounter on their heart-stopping journey through space?

What books are on your winter TBR? What books are you looking forward to being published? Have you read any of these? Tell me where I should start.

Picture by: https://pixabay.com/fi/users/tombud-1908037/ and Goodreads cover images.

V for Vendetta

“Behind this mask there is more than just flesh. Beneath this mask there is an idea… and ideas are bulletproof.”
― Alan Moore, V for Vendetta

V for Vendetta is a graphic novel written by Alan Moore and illustrated by David Lloyd. In these comics, there is alternate dystopian vision of Britain in the 1990s. The fascist Norsefire party has exterminated its opponents in concentration camps and rules the country. Comics follow V, an anarchist, who starts a revolution to bring down the government.

I like V. I adore V as character. He’s very well created. We can see him as hero fighting for a noble cause  or we can think that he is simply a maniac causing a lot of chaos with supernatural powers and brilliant mind. He is a mystery. I also like how the plot enwraps, all the little surprises you don’t see coming and everything you could quote in V for Vendetta … Quotes, they are bulletproof.

“Everybody is special. Everybody. Everybody is a hero, a lover, a fool, a villain. Everybody. Everybody has their story to tell.”
― Alan Moore, V for Vendetta

Graphic novels like this are always a bit twisted and they’re supposed to be like that. I am a bit conflicted about Evey, V’s protégé. First of all she’s very young. Second of all, she’s kidnapped by this mysterious man in a mask who holds her prisoner, brainwashes her for her own good and in the end Evey nearly falls in love with him. But hey let’s not read too much into that.

I don’t see anarchism doing any good and I don’t support anarchism, however I understand portrayal of anarchism in arts, especially in dystopian worlds like this one. I think it goes along with the vigilantes and freedom fighters in comics and literature in general (Robin Hood, Green Arrow, pirates etc….). We are given two ultimatums in these comics: fascism or anarchism so I understand the appeal of anarchism. Though, in the end, we don’t know what happened after.

5/5 stars

Tips

1. If you’ve never read graphic novels before but you’d like to try it out, here’s one you should start with it! Unless you don’t like dark stuff, in that case turn away from V for Vendetta.
2. Perfect November read! And if you like this, read Watchmen by Alan Moore, there are connections to V for Vendetta.
3. Content: dystopian Britain, violence, anarchism, fascism, twistedness, death and destruction.
4. MOVIE! If you’re not going to read the comics, see the movie because V is awesome in flesh. One of my all time favorite movies. (And he is just a freedom fighter in movie.)

“Remember, remember the fifth of November of gunpowder treason and plot. I know of no reason why the gun powder treason should ever be forgot.”
― Alan Moore, V for Vendetta
Do you read comics?

Buy V for Vendetta on Amazon