How-To Go There & Back Again

“Sorry! I don’t want any adventures, thank you. Not Today. Good morning! But please come to tea -any time you like! Why not tomorrow? Good bye!”
― J.R.R. Tolkien, The Hobbit

Hobbit is classic you must read at least once. It is highly charming story of adventure.  It teases and gives you a hint that something greater is ahead. It also instructs and lectures without it being too obvious. Tolkien tells the story well. Hobbit is fantastic mix of humor and adventure. You’ll also notice that writing is of high quality and that author knows how to pull you in new world.

Characters in Hobbit are  attractive. Bilbo Baggins is not the hero you’d expect…He is very simple and doesn’t possess any magical powers. Adventure might be in his blood, but it’s not really his thing. He’d much rather stay in his home. Thorin Oakenshield is stubborn occasionally brave and occasionally greedy but my most favorite character after Bilbo. Fíli and Kíli are are humorous and loyal to their uncle Thorin. Gandalf mostly protects the company being the wizard and Gandalf also has his own kind of gentle humour.

“Voiceless it cries,
Wingless flutters,
Toothless bites,
Mouthless mutters.”
― J.R.R. Tolkien, The Hobbit

Great book, yet sometimes you might find it difficult to read long chapters in the forest. I suppose it’s Tolkiens way to even the pace of the story and make the enjoyment of reading last longer. Ending of Hobbit was sad.

“Go back?” he thought. “No good at all! Go sideways? Impossible! Go forward? Only thing to do! On we go!” So up he got, and trotted along with his little sword held in front of him and one hand feeling the wall, and his heart all of a patter and a pitter.”
― J.R.R. Tolkien, The Hobbit

I’d give this book 9/10

How-To Read Hobbit or There and Back Again
1.
Go with low expectations, this book is very hypedFind the one with illustrations. Book in the pictures is illustrated by  Alan Lee.
2. Don’t miss this if you really enjoyed reading Lord of the Rings. You might not like Hobbit but it gives a lot of background to LoTR.
3. Gollum’s riddles are cool. Try to solve them yourself.
4. Bilbo might be a bit frustrating sometimes. It’s also nice book to read out loud.
5. Hobbits, Elves, Trolls, Goblins, Dwarves, Wargs…
6. Movies are definitely worth watching but they are really stretching the events that take place in the book. Ed Sheeran’s I See Fire is just perfect to listen to when you read this book.

What is your favorite Tolkien book? What did you think of the movies?

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16 thoughts on “How-To Go There & Back Again

  1. worldlittlelights says:

    Lovee this book! It is the first book I bought in the U.S. so I always treasure it and remember it well. I love the style of writing and especially the songs in the book. I am normally scared of books with adventures because I am afraid of getting bored. That’s why I was so hesitated to read Harry Potter and The Hobbit, but both of them give me so much thrill and admiration for the writers. My co-blogger is a huge fan of Tolkien by the way :) But thanks for writing!

    Liked by 1 person

  2. Bauhinia says:

    Even though I haven’t started reading “Lord of the Rings”, “The Hobbit” is certainly one of my favourite fictions so far. The plot of this grand adventure does fill my days with excitement, and I can easily immerse myself into such a magical world for a whole day! Thanks for your sharing :)

    Liked by 1 person

  3. honya says:

    One of my all-time favorites! I first read this when I was still pretty little (like, seven or eight) and have loved it ever since. I love the simplicity of Bilbo–and the message that even small, unprepared people can be a part of something great. Plus Tolkien’s writing style is incredible (a little overly-descriptive, but still wonderful). Thanks for a great review! :)

    Liked by 1 person

    • Anastasia says:

      Thank you! ^^ I read Hobbit when I was pretty small too, I think it’s more magical when you are younger (as all books are probably). Yes, I agree, okay of course we have to learn about Hobbits but sometimes descriptions… I almost want to say just move along the story already :D

      Like

  4. bookheathen says:

    I always have to remember that this is a fairy tale for young people and the young at heart, rather than a deeply moral and philosophical work of adult literature like LOTR. – tho’ Hobbit does give some moral lessons too. Great book! Shame about the films.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Anastasia says:

      :) Indeed. And I think it’s sometimes a problem when you see differently the books you have loved in your childhood. Hobbit had good messages in it :) I liked the first film but I don’t understand why to make 3 parts of such short book

      Like

  5. Molly Mortensen says:

    I loved the Hobbit as a kid! It was the book I’d always try to read because I remember it being so hard. I don’t know why but I never went on to read Lord of the Rings and even when I read the Hobbit as an adult I didn’t continue on.

    I never liked Thorin in the book (I do in the movie) but I liked Fili and Kili. It’s going to be so sad to see that ending in the theater, because I think I liked the characters even more in the movie!

    3. I’m terrible at riddles! 4. It’s a terrific book to read out loud!

    Liked by 1 person

    • Anastasia says:

      :) I think maybe both LOTR and Hobbit are better when you are in your teens.
      I realized after your comment that maybe I like Thorin more after the movies, however I did like him in the books too. I think I will sob when I will watch the final movie

      Like

  6. Liberty of Thinking says:

    Probably the greatest pages of literature ever written, come from Tolkien’s pen (and pipe:-)).
    I had the privilege to read them around the time I turned 50, as in my country of origin, continental writers, mostly French and German, were preferred…
    In my humble opinion, Jackson’s visual translations represent one of history’s greatest, successful artistic enterprises.
    I hope Phillip Pullman’s HDM shall become the next best thing for true art lovers.
    I’m glad there’s a younger generation out there, with the same burning love for great literature as my slowly vanishing one. I’m proud to have given it over to my own children.
    Can’t wait to see the third Hobbit, due in a few weeks in the UK…

    Liked by 1 person

    • Anastasia says:

      Probably :) I see, well I think that just proves that Tolkien attracts audiences of any age.
      HDM still seems to be not so known piece of literature, I hope it would become more popular and that it would be in future considered as classic.
      Just bought the night ticket for Hobbit movie, I have pretty high expectations for it ^^
      Thank you for your comment!

      Like

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